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webrand-jerad
New Member

Filing jointly with a dependant. As soon as I add my spouse's income we go from a return to a significant amount owed. My wife is a police officer and does not pay SS tax. Does that have an affect on this? It is the only thing that is different.

We both may roughly the same within $500. She actually pays more in federal taxes. As soon as I add her income we owe... a lot. It says she did not pay enough. How or what can I do to lessen this tax burden. Is she being penalized for not paying into Social Security as a public employee?
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Accepted Solutions
Coleen3
Intuit Alumni

Filing jointly with a dependant. As soon as I add my spouse's income we go from a return to a significant amount owed. My wife is a police officer and does not pay SS tax. Does that have an affect on this? It is the only thing that is different.

What is withheld for social security has no bearing on a refund or balance due.

This happens frequently with married couples who by themselves are taxed at a lower rate but are pushed into a higher rate with the second income. Make sure you both have zero on your W-4 at work and you may have to ask for an additional amount to be withheld over and above that. The exemption you put on your individual W-4 tells your employer how much to withhold based on weekly or bi-weekly income. The table can't possibly take into account that there is a second income and together all the income is taxed at a higher rate.

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1 Reply
Coleen3
Intuit Alumni

Filing jointly with a dependant. As soon as I add my spouse's income we go from a return to a significant amount owed. My wife is a police officer and does not pay SS tax. Does that have an affect on this? It is the only thing that is different.

What is withheld for social security has no bearing on a refund or balance due.

This happens frequently with married couples who by themselves are taxed at a lower rate but are pushed into a higher rate with the second income. Make sure you both have zero on your W-4 at work and you may have to ask for an additional amount to be withheld over and above that. The exemption you put on your individual W-4 tells your employer how much to withhold based on weekly or bi-weekly income. The table can't possibly take into account that there is a second income and together all the income is taxed at a higher rate.

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