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Level 1

Do I need 1095-A if I'm covered under parents' health insurance and not a dependent?

I am 25 and covered under my parents' marketplace health insurance, but they do not claim me as dependent. They pay for 100% of the health insurance. Do I need to enter a 1095-A, and would I even recieve one if I do not pay for the insurance?
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Level 11

Do I need 1095-A if I'm covered under parents' health insurance and not a dependent?

If your parents told the Healthcare Marketplace (usually when they applied for health insurance) that you were not going to be their dependent, you will probably receive a 1095-A of your own, and you will need to enter that into TurboTax.


If your parents did NOT tell the Healthcare Marketplace (usually when they applied for health insurance) that you were not going to be their dependent, you will NOT receive a 1095-A of your own. 

You will need to get a copy of your parents' 1095-A and enter it on your tax return.  On the screen after entering the 1095-A, you will check the box indicating that the policy was shared by somebody that is not on your tax return.  It will then prompt you with further questions to determine how much of it is "allocated" to you (even if it is 0%). Your parents would follow this same procedure.

If there was Advance credit received (column C of the 1095-A), your parents have the option to claim 100% of the 1095-A on their tax return, or to "allocate" part (or all) of it to you.  If you both agree, the allocation can be anywhere from 0% to 100%.  If you can not agree and Advance credit was received (column C on the 1095-A), then it is divided by the number of people on the insurance policy.  For example, if the insurance policy covers 4 people, each person is allocated 25%.


EDIT:  This Tax Tip might not be valid if your (the child) income is below 100% of the Poverty Level ($11,670 for a Single person in 2015 in the Continental US).  TurboTax will calculate it as valid, but the legal gibberish indicates it may be questionable in those cases.  Eventually, the IRS will probably give further clarification.

Tax tip:  Assuming you are in a lower "poverty level" than your parents (lower income per household size, see Line 5 of Form 8962), it is usually more beneficial for ALL of the 1095-A to be "allocated" to YOU.

If your parents are agreeable to it, it would be good to do your tax return side-by-side with your parents return, to see how allocating things affect your tax return.  In most cases, the best overall outcome will be if 100% is allocated to the tax return with the lowest poverty percentage (see Line 5 of Form 8962).

If you do that, I would highly recommend using the CD/downloaded version of TurboTax, rather than the Online version.


If there was NO Advance credit received (column C of the 1095-A), it's a bit more complicated.

  • You look up the SLCSP that applies to you and enter it in column B of the 1095-A (ignore what is actually on the 1095-A): https://www.healthcare.gov/tax-tool/  
  • When you check the box to indicate the policy was shared with somebody that is not on your tax return, for "Your SLCSP Percentage" and "Your Advance payment of PTC Percentage", leave them BLANK.
  • For "Your Premium Percentage", see "Allocation Situation #3" in the instructions for what to enter for the percentage.  https://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/i8962.pdf#page=16
  • Example.

    Gary and his 25-year-old nondependent son, Jim, enroll in a qualified health plan. Jim has no dependents. The policy covers Gary, Jim, and Gary’s two young daughters who are Gary’s dependents. No APTC is paid for this policy. The Form 1095-A furnished by the Marketplace to Gary shows an enrollment premium of $15,000 for the year and the SLCSP premium that applies to a coverage family that incorrectly includes Gary, Gary's daughters, and Jim. (Some states may report -0- or leave column B blank on the Form 1095-A when no APTC is paid.) Gary and Jim determine that the SLCSP premium that applies to Gary and his two dependents is $12,000 and the SLCSP premium that applies to Jim is $6,000. Gary and Jim are applicable taxpayers and each can take the PTC.

    Gary computes his credit using his household income and family size of three, and the applicable SLCSP premium for a coverage family of three of $12,000. Jim computes his credit using his household income and family size of one, and the applicable SLCSP premium for a coverage family of one of $6,000.

    Gary and Jim must allocate the enrollment premiums of $15,000 reported on the Form 1095-A, Part III, column A, in proportion to each taxpayer's applicable SLCSP premium as follows. Gary’s allocated enrollment premiums are $10,000 ($15,000 x $12,000/$18,000) (67% of the total premiums of $15,000) and Jim’s allocated enrollment premiums are $5,000 ($15,000 x $6,000/$18,000) (33% of the total premiums of $15,000).

    Gary enters Jim’s social security number on line 30, column (b), and enters “0.67” in column (e). Jim enters Gary’s social security number on line 30, column (b), and enters “0.33” in column (e). Gary and Jim leave line 30, columns (f) and (g), blank.

126 Replies
Level 1

Do I need 1095-A if I'm covered under parents' health insurance and not a dependent?

Recommended answer indicates the tip may not be valid for adult children under poverty level. Has there been any clarification from the irs on this yet?
Level 11

Do I need 1095-A if I'm covered under parents' health insurance and not a dependent?

If your parents told the Healthcare Marketplace (usually when they applied for health insurance) that you were not going to be their dependent, you will probably receive a 1095-A of your own, and you will need to enter that into TurboTax.


If your parents did NOT tell the Healthcare Marketplace (usually when they applied for health insurance) that you were not going to be their dependent, you will NOT receive a 1095-A of your own. 

You will need to get a copy of your parents' 1095-A and enter it on your tax return.  On the screen after entering the 1095-A, you will check the box indicating that the policy was shared by somebody that is not on your tax return.  It will then prompt you with further questions to determine how much of it is "allocated" to you (even if it is 0%). Your parents would follow this same procedure.

If there was Advance credit received (column C of the 1095-A), your parents have the option to claim 100% of the 1095-A on their tax return, or to "allocate" part (or all) of it to you.  If you both agree, the allocation can be anywhere from 0% to 100%.  If you can not agree and Advance credit was received (column C on the 1095-A), then it is divided by the number of people on the insurance policy.  For example, if the insurance policy covers 4 people, each person is allocated 25%.


EDIT:  This Tax Tip might not be valid if your (the child) income is below 100% of the Poverty Level ($11,670 for a Single person in 2015 in the Continental US).  TurboTax will calculate it as valid, but the legal gibberish indicates it may be questionable in those cases.  Eventually, the IRS will probably give further clarification.

Tax tip:  Assuming you are in a lower "poverty level" than your parents (lower income per household size, see Line 5 of Form 8962), it is usually more beneficial for ALL of the 1095-A to be "allocated" to YOU.

If your parents are agreeable to it, it would be good to do your tax return side-by-side with your parents return, to see how allocating things affect your tax return.  In most cases, the best overall outcome will be if 100% is allocated to the tax return with the lowest poverty percentage (see Line 5 of Form 8962).

If you do that, I would highly recommend using the CD/downloaded version of TurboTax, rather than the Online version.


If there was NO Advance credit received (column C of the 1095-A), it's a bit more complicated.

  • You look up the SLCSP that applies to you and enter it in column B of the 1095-A (ignore what is actually on the 1095-A): https://www.healthcare.gov/tax-tool/  
  • When you check the box to indicate the policy was shared with somebody that is not on your tax return, for "Your SLCSP Percentage" and "Your Advance payment of PTC Percentage", leave them BLANK.
  • For "Your Premium Percentage", see "Allocation Situation #3" in the instructions for what to enter for the percentage.  https://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/i8962.pdf#page=16
  • Example.

    Gary and his 25-year-old nondependent son, Jim, enroll in a qualified health plan. Jim has no dependents. The policy covers Gary, Jim, and Gary’s two young daughters who are Gary’s dependents. No APTC is paid for this policy. The Form 1095-A furnished by the Marketplace to Gary shows an enrollment premium of $15,000 for the year and the SLCSP premium that applies to a coverage family that incorrectly includes Gary, Gary's daughters, and Jim. (Some states may report -0- or leave column B blank on the Form 1095-A when no APTC is paid.) Gary and Jim determine that the SLCSP premium that applies to Gary and his two dependents is $12,000 and the SLCSP premium that applies to Jim is $6,000. Gary and Jim are applicable taxpayers and each can take the PTC.

    Gary computes his credit using his household income and family size of three, and the applicable SLCSP premium for a coverage family of three of $12,000. Jim computes his credit using his household income and family size of one, and the applicable SLCSP premium for a coverage family of one of $6,000.

    Gary and Jim must allocate the enrollment premiums of $15,000 reported on the Form 1095-A, Part III, column A, in proportion to each taxpayer's applicable SLCSP premium as follows. Gary’s allocated enrollment premiums are $10,000 ($15,000 x $12,000/$18,000) (67% of the total premiums of $15,000) and Jim’s allocated enrollment premiums are $5,000 ($15,000 x $6,000/$18,000) (33% of the total premiums of $15,000).

    Gary enters Jim’s social security number on line 30, column (b), and enters “0.67” in column (e). Jim enters Gary’s social security number on line 30, column (b), and enters “0.33” in column (e). Gary and Jim leave line 30, columns (f) and (g), blank.

Level 1

Do I need 1095-A if I'm covered under parents' health insurance and not a dependent?

Thanks, My 22 year old daughter can't be claimed as a dependent because she's went over the income limit and is not a full time student but she still stay with us and is on our Marketplace policy and we received only one 1095-A, I guess the 100% parents and 0% daughter allocation will work for us.
Level 11

Do I need 1095-A if I'm covered under parents' health insurance and not a dependent?

That will work, but most likely the best result would be the other way around.  Allocate 100% to the daughter, and 0% to the parents.
Level 1

Do I need 1095-A if I'm covered under parents' health insurance and not a dependent?

Hi TaxGuyBill, Will the IRS question this because there's a big different of $500 allocating 100% to the daughter, and 0% to the parents? I don't need a letter in the mail saying she have to pay something back or is just a matter of choice use our income or my daughter income. Thanks
Level 11

Do I need 1095-A if I'm covered under parents' health insurance and not a dependent?

They shouldn't.  They specifically say it can be allocated any way you want.  Just be sure you enter it on both tax returns, or you will get a notice.
Level 1

Do I need 1095-A if I'm covered under parents' health insurance and not a dependent?

Thanks TaxGuyBill, Great advice! 🙂
Level 1

Do I need 1095-A if I'm covered under parents' health insurance and not a dependent?

I was on my parents Obama care plan but got married mid year so I'm filling my own taxes. I understand I needs fill in the 1095-a that my parents got, but I'm not understanding the allocation process. I obviously made less money than my parents. Would it be more beneficial for me to claim 100%? If so does that mean I'll get a higher return and they'll get less?
Level 11

Do I need 1095-A if I'm covered under parents' health insurance and not a dependent?

Yes, and yes.  But your increase of refund should be MORE than their decrease in refund.

I do suggest discussing it with your parents, and trying it out both ways to see what the overall results are.