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jamese20
New Member

Can i claim my mother in law if she is younger than i am, and i provide total support?

 
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MichaelDC
New Member

Can i claim my mother in law if she is younger than i am, and i provide total support?

Yes, you can. Here is a checklist for determining whether your mother-in-law (or other relative) qualifies. Please feel free to post any additional details or questions in the comment section.

  • Do they live with you? Most relatives don't need to live with you, including your mother-in-law.
  • Do they make less than $4,050? Your relative cannot have a gross income of more than $4,050 and be claimed by you as a dependent. 
  • Do you financially support them? You must provide more than half of your relative’s total support each year. 
  • Are they a citizen or resident? The person must be a U.S. citizen, a U.S. national, a U.S. resident, or a resident of Canada or Mexico. Many people wonder if they can claim a foreign-exchange student who temporarily lives with them. The answer is maybe, but only if they meet this requirement.
  • Are you the only person claiming them as a dependent? You can’t claim someone who takes a personal exemption for himself or claims another dependent on his own tax form.
  • Are they filing a joint return? You cannot claim someone who is married and files a joint tax return. Say you support your married teen-aged son: If he files a joint return with his spouse, you can’t claim him as a dependent.


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1 Reply
MichaelDC
New Member

Can i claim my mother in law if she is younger than i am, and i provide total support?

Yes, you can. Here is a checklist for determining whether your mother-in-law (or other relative) qualifies. Please feel free to post any additional details or questions in the comment section.

  • Do they live with you? Most relatives don't need to live with you, including your mother-in-law.
  • Do they make less than $4,050? Your relative cannot have a gross income of more than $4,050 and be claimed by you as a dependent. 
  • Do you financially support them? You must provide more than half of your relative’s total support each year. 
  • Are they a citizen or resident? The person must be a U.S. citizen, a U.S. national, a U.S. resident, or a resident of Canada or Mexico. Many people wonder if they can claim a foreign-exchange student who temporarily lives with them. The answer is maybe, but only if they meet this requirement.
  • Are you the only person claiming them as a dependent? You can’t claim someone who takes a personal exemption for himself or claims another dependent on his own tax form.
  • Are they filing a joint return? You cannot claim someone who is married and files a joint tax return. Say you support your married teen-aged son: If he files a joint return with his spouse, you can’t claim him as a dependent.


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