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What I owe hasn't changed with mileage deductions

 
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What I owe hasn't changed with mileage deductions

If you're a W-2 employee claiming unreimbursed employee business expenses (such as mileage), then whether it will impact your tax return depends on your circumstances.

Employee business expenses are an itemized deduction on Schedule A.  That means you have to be able to itemize in order to get any of the deduction.  If the standard deduction (currently $6300 single, $12,600 married filing jointly) is greater than all your itemized deductions, then you'll get the standard since it's worth more to you.  In that case, you won't get any itemized deductions.

Also, employee business expenses are a specific type of deduction -- a "2%" misc deduction -- which means the total of those deductions has to surpass 2% of your adjusted gross income before you'll receive the first dollar of deduction. The higher your income, the higher the threshold you have to surpass.

Without knowing the details of your tax return, these are two common reasons why folks may not see any impact when claiming employee business expenses.

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New Member

What I owe hasn't changed with mileage deductions

If you're a W-2 employee claiming unreimbursed employee business expenses (such as mileage), then whether it will impact your tax return depends on your circumstances.

Employee business expenses are an itemized deduction on Schedule A.  That means you have to be able to itemize in order to get any of the deduction.  If the standard deduction (currently $6300 single, $12,600 married filing jointly) is greater than all your itemized deductions, then you'll get the standard since it's worth more to you.  In that case, you won't get any itemized deductions.

Also, employee business expenses are a specific type of deduction -- a "2%" misc deduction -- which means the total of those deductions has to surpass 2% of your adjusted gross income before you'll receive the first dollar of deduction. The higher your income, the higher the threshold you have to surpass.

Without knowing the details of your tax return, these are two common reasons why folks may not see any impact when claiming employee business expenses.

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