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Level 1

Sold house and bought new house

we reinvested all of the proceeds from the house we sold.  Both properties closed on the same day.
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Alumni

Sold house and bought new house

Reinvesting the proceeds into another house makes no difference at all to the taxability of profit from the sale of the first home.
Form 2119 was discontinued by the Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997. Since that time, you can not defer capital gains on a home by buying one of equal or greater value. What you can do, if you owned and lived in the home for 2 of the 5 years ending on the sale date, is to not have to pay tax on a gain of up to $250,000 (Single), or $500,000 (Married Filing Jointly). Note that if you ever used the home as a rental, then the exclusion does not apply to any gain equal to the depreciation that you claimed or could have claimed.
For further info, see IRS Pubs, 530, 523, and 17
http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/p530.pdf
http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/p523.pdf
http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/p17.pdf

The sale of a personal residence and then purchase of another are two independent transactions. You report the Sale of a personal residence at:
Federal Taxes
Wages & Income
choose I'll choose what I work on, if asked  OR  Jump to Full List
Scroll down to
Less Common Income
on the
Sale of Home line, click start or update
then enter the necessary information in response to the interview

The purchase of a new personal residence is not a reportable event.
You can deduct mortgage interest, points, and real estate property tax paid at closing. You report those expenses along with other mortgage interest/property taxes paid in the year at
Federal Taxes (or Personal if using Home and Business)
Deductions And Credits
choose I'll choose what I work on, if asked OR Jump to Full List
My Home

All other costs paid at closing, including transfer taxes, "stamps", escrow fees, etc., are NOT deductible from current income, instead you add them to the cost basis of your home and you will get the benefit when you sell.
1 Reply
Highlighted
Alumni

Sold house and bought new house

Reinvesting the proceeds into another house makes no difference at all to the taxability of profit from the sale of the first home.
Form 2119 was discontinued by the Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997. Since that time, you can not defer capital gains on a home by buying one of equal or greater value. What you can do, if you owned and lived in the home for 2 of the 5 years ending on the sale date, is to not have to pay tax on a gain of up to $250,000 (Single), or $500,000 (Married Filing Jointly). Note that if you ever used the home as a rental, then the exclusion does not apply to any gain equal to the depreciation that you claimed or could have claimed.
For further info, see IRS Pubs, 530, 523, and 17
http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/p530.pdf
http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/p523.pdf
http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/p17.pdf

The sale of a personal residence and then purchase of another are two independent transactions. You report the Sale of a personal residence at:
Federal Taxes
Wages & Income
choose I'll choose what I work on, if asked  OR  Jump to Full List
Scroll down to
Less Common Income
on the
Sale of Home line, click start or update
then enter the necessary information in response to the interview

The purchase of a new personal residence is not a reportable event.
You can deduct mortgage interest, points, and real estate property tax paid at closing. You report those expenses along with other mortgage interest/property taxes paid in the year at
Federal Taxes (or Personal if using Home and Business)
Deductions And Credits
choose I'll choose what I work on, if asked OR Jump to Full List
My Home

All other costs paid at closing, including transfer taxes, "stamps", escrow fees, etc., are NOT deductible from current income, instead you add them to the cost basis of your home and you will get the benefit when you sell.