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writechantelle
Level 1

New W-4 and expected nonrefundable credits

I expect to have to buy a furnace and AC over the next year. I'm hoping to find one that qualifies for the tax credit, but I understand it's "nonrefundable" - which if I understand correctly means I need to make sure that I owe taxes before the credit. Otherwise it's lost, not refunded.

 

In the past I could have changed the W-4, but now it's unclear to me where I put the expected credit. The IRS worksheet seems to suggest that I put it under Step 3: Dependents? Is that right? Should I put the expected amount of the credit...or the amount I expect to spend on the AC/Furnace themselves?

1 Best answer

Accepted Solutions
AmeliesUncle
Level 12

New W-4 and expected nonrefundable credits


@writechantelle wrote:

which if I understand correctly means I need to make sure that I owe taxes before the credit.

 

In the past I could have changed the W-4


"Owe taxes before the credit" does NOT mean that you would actually owe the IRS money (the opposite of a refund).  It means that you have income taxes NOT including your withholding on your W-4.

 

Let's say your tax return shows $5000 of income tax, but you had $6000 of income taxes withheld from your pay (resulting in a $1000 refund).  The credit is based on the $5000 of income tax BEFORE you factor in the incomes taxes withheld from your pay.  So in that scenario, a $500 tax credit would result increase your $1000 refund and you would get a $1500 refund.

View solution in original post

2 Replies
AmeliesUncle
Level 12

New W-4 and expected nonrefundable credits


@writechantelle wrote:

which if I understand correctly means I need to make sure that I owe taxes before the credit.

 

In the past I could have changed the W-4


"Owe taxes before the credit" does NOT mean that you would actually owe the IRS money (the opposite of a refund).  It means that you have income taxes NOT including your withholding on your W-4.

 

Let's say your tax return shows $5000 of income tax, but you had $6000 of income taxes withheld from your pay (resulting in a $1000 refund).  The credit is based on the $5000 of income tax BEFORE you factor in the incomes taxes withheld from your pay.  So in that scenario, a $500 tax credit would result increase your $1000 refund and you would get a $1500 refund.

View solution in original post

ColeenD3
Employee Tax Expert

New W-4 and expected nonrefundable credits

Here is a list of non-refundable credits. If you have any other credit on this list, it will affect your energy credit.

See Schedule 3 for the list.

 

Schedule 3

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