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jamaican__prince
New Member

If I made 35,000 and still live with mom she pays rent etc I take care of my car note and insurance do I lose money if she claims me as a dependent

 
2 Replies
DoninGA
Level 15

If I made 35,000 and still live with mom she pays rent etc I take care of my car note and insurance do I lose money if she claims me as a dependent

Assuming that you are age 19 or older and not a full time student under the age of 24, then no one can claim you as a dependent if your gross income is $4,200 or more for 2019.

 

To be a Qualifying Relative -

1. The person cannot be your qualifying child or the qualifying child of any other taxpayer. A child is not the qualifying child of any other taxpayer if the child's parent (or any other person for whom the child is defined as a qualifying child) is not required to file an income tax return or files an income tax return only to get a refund on income tax withheld.
2. The person either (a) must be related to you or (b) must live with you all year as a member of your household.
3. The person's gross income for the year must be less than $4,200 (social security does not count) in 2019
4. You must provide more than half of the person's total support for the year.
5. The person must be a U.S. citizen or a U.S., Canada, or Mexico resident for some part of the year.
6. The person must not file a joint return with their spouse.

Hal_Al
Level 15

If I made 35,000 and still live with mom she pays rent etc I take care of my car note and insurance do I lose money if she claims me as a dependent

With the tax law change, effective 2018, most people, with income from working,  will get the same refund whether they claim themselves or not. The personal exemption has been eliminated and the standard deduction increased.

 

But, as others have indicated, you've asked the wrong question.  The real question is: is  your mom even allowed to claim you.  That depends on where you live, your age and student status, as well as how much you make and how you spend your money.  A simple answer (but not necessarily accurate one) is: people who make (and spend) $35K a year cannot be dependents.

 

There are two types of dependents, "Qualifying Children"(QC) and standard ("Qualifying Relative" in IRS parlance even though they don't have to actually be related). There is no income limit for a QC but there is an age limit, a relationship test and residence test.

 

A child of a taxpayer can still be a “Qualifying Child” (QC) dependent, regardless of his/her income, if:

  1. He is under age 19, or under 24 if a full time student for at least 5 months of the year, or is totally & permanently disabled
  2. He did not provide more than 1/2 his own support. Scholarships are considered third party support and not as support provided by the student.
  3. He lived with the parent (including temporary absences such as away at school) for more than half the year

 

So, it doesn't matter how much he earned. What matters is how much he spent on support. Money he put into savings does not count as support he spent on him self.

The support value of the home, provided by the parent, is the fair market rental value of the home plus utilities & other expenses divided by the number of occupants.

 

If you do not meet the QC rules, then just having more than $4200 of income disqualifies you from being a dependent. 

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