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jasonvt
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I was covered under a family CDHP plan with HRA with my wife's employer from Jan-Oct. In Nov- Dec I had my own HDHP with HSA. Whats is my limit to contribute to the HSA.

I was covered under a family CDHP plan with HRA with my wife's employer (State) from Jan-Oct. In Nov and Dec I had my own HDHP with HSA.  I am trying to figure out what my limit is to contribute to the HSA. For the self, I know its $3400, but does the CDHP with HRA count as a family HDHP? The deductible was $4500. If so, the maximum is $6192. And if it is, does the $1200 that my wife's employer put in the HRA count against the maximum I can contribute the the HSA? (Can I put in $6192 or can I only put in $4992?) or is is $3400 if the CDHP doesnt qualify?

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I was covered under a family CDHP plan with HRA with my wife's employer from Jan-Oct. In Nov- Dec I had my own HDHP with HSA. Whats is my limit to contribute to the HSA.

A CDHP is a Consumer Directed Health Plan. This is an industry term, not an IRS term, which refers to the pairing of a health plan to a tax-deferred vehicle for paying the plan's deductible. Whether or not the health plan in a CDHP is an HDHP is a question of fact about your plan (that is, it may be and it may not be). This question should be directed to the benefits or HR group at your wife's company (State).

Generally, a taxpayer who is covered by an a full HRA (as opposed to a limited purpose or retirement HRA) is not eligible to make contributions to an HSA. So even if the health plan in your CDHP were an HDHP, you still would not be eligible to make contributions to an HSA.

This means that you were eligible to make contributions to your HSA for only two months (Nov-Dec). Your calculations should be independent of whatever happened before November.

However, at this point, because you were under the HDHP on December 1, 2017, you are eligible to invoke the last-month rule, which would allow you to use the full annual HSA contribution even though you were not in the HDHP all year. The only catch is that you would have to stay in the HDHP for the next twelve months (all of 2018) in order to avoid penalties for "failure to maintain HDHP coverage." 

The last-month rule is automatically invoked by TurboTax. So your HSA contribution limit for 2017 will be $3,400 (Self), $6,750 (Family) or $4,400 or $7,750 respectively if you are 55 or over.

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I was covered under a family CDHP plan with HRA with my wife's employer from Jan-Oct. In Nov- Dec I had my own HDHP with HSA. Whats is my limit to contribute to the HSA.

A CDHP is a Consumer Directed Health Plan. This is an industry term, not an IRS term, which refers to the pairing of a health plan to a tax-deferred vehicle for paying the plan's deductible. Whether or not the health plan in a CDHP is an HDHP is a question of fact about your plan (that is, it may be and it may not be). This question should be directed to the benefits or HR group at your wife's company (State).

Generally, a taxpayer who is covered by an a full HRA (as opposed to a limited purpose or retirement HRA) is not eligible to make contributions to an HSA. So even if the health plan in your CDHP were an HDHP, you still would not be eligible to make contributions to an HSA.

This means that you were eligible to make contributions to your HSA for only two months (Nov-Dec). Your calculations should be independent of whatever happened before November.

However, at this point, because you were under the HDHP on December 1, 2017, you are eligible to invoke the last-month rule, which would allow you to use the full annual HSA contribution even though you were not in the HDHP all year. The only catch is that you would have to stay in the HDHP for the next twelve months (all of 2018) in order to avoid penalties for "failure to maintain HDHP coverage." 

The last-month rule is automatically invoked by TurboTax. So your HSA contribution limit for 2017 will be $3,400 (Self), $6,750 (Family) or $4,400 or $7,750 respectively if you are 55 or over.

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