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lauralitzell
New Member

I'm lost. The state bought have our property and they gave us 1099-S and I do not know where i am supposed to enter this info?

and we used the proceeds of that sale payoff house and student loans
3 Replies
DoninGA
Level 15

I'm lost. The state bought have our property and they gave us 1099-S and I do not know where i am supposed to enter this info?

What property was sold?  Your personal primary residence?  A second or vacation home?  Land?  Something else?

JulieS
Employee Tax Expert

I'm lost. The state bought have our property and they gave us 1099-S and I do not know where i am supposed to enter this info?

Form 1099-S is used to report the sale of real estate. You have to report any 1099-S form you get on your tax return. 

 

Since you say the state bought it, it sounds like an easement. That is where you end up selling a portion of your land, usually to a government agency. 

 

These instructions apply to the sale of an easement or other land. If you sold your home, farmland or a business property, please respond with more detail because the process is different.

  1. Log in and continue your return. 
  2. Click on Income & Expenses near the upper left.
  3.  Look for Investment Income on the  list. If you don't see it, click on Add More Income in the lower left corner.
  4. Select Stocks, Mutual Funds, Bonds, Other and click Start or Edit to the right.
  5. Answer the first question, "Did you sell stocks, mutual funds, bonds, or other investments in 2019?" Yes.
  6. Answer the second question, "Did or will you receive a 1099-B form or brokerage statement for these sales?" No.
  7. Enter a description on the next screen.
  8. Select the property type that applies to your sale: Land (personal), if it is land that was part of your home. Land (other investment purpose), if it is land that has never been part of your home. Second Home or Other, if that applies.
  9. Enter your information from the 1099-S form. 
  10. Proceeds and the date should match what is on the 1099-S form.
  11. For Total amount paid enter your basis, which is the amount you paid for the property that was sold.

 

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Hal_Al
Level 15

I'm lost. The state bought have our property and they gave us 1099-S and I do not know where i am supposed to enter this info?

The state bought half your property, in what sounds like eminent domain.  Eminent domain takings and easements are handled the same.  It does not matter what you did with the money.

 

You do not normally report the sale or any gain or loss.  You simply reduce the cost basis in the remaining property by what you received.  For example if you originally paid $100,000 for you home and the state took half the land and paid you $25,000; your new cost basis is $75,000.  When you sell the home, in the future, your capital gain (profit) will be based on the new $75,000 basis (cost).  For example if it sells for $200,000, your capital gain will be $125,000 (200K -75K=125K).

 

But, the IRS expects that 1099-S to show up on your tax return.  So, you report it in a way that shows 0 capital gain.  That is, you enter the 1099-S amount as both your sales amount and your cost basis. See this previous answer for details on how to do that: https://ttlc.intuit.com/community/taxes/discussion/you-normally-do-not-report-the-income-for-grantin...

 

There are some alternate ways to do it, but most people choose the above.  For alternates see:

https://ttlc.intuit.com/community/investments-and-rental-properties/discussion/i-received-a-1099-s-f...

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