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aaadiscjockeys
New Member

I lived with my paents last year while I was treated for cancer. they provided over 1/2 of my support--

should they claim me?... or should I claim myself on my return?
1 Best answer

Accepted Solutions
IreneS
Intuit Alumni

I lived with my paents last year while I was treated for cancer. they provided over 1/2 of my support--

I'm sorry to hear about the cancer.  I hope you're doing well.

You can file your own return if you had income and are either required to file or want to file in order to get back any withholding. If you are single and your age is:

  • under 65 - your gross income must be at least $10,350
  • 65 or older - your gross income must be at least $11,900


If you are not required to file a return, and choose not to file, you can let your parents claim you as a dependent as long as you meet the requirements as a qualifying child or qualifying relative.

Qualifying Child

1.  Relationship - You're their daughter -- no problem there.

2.  Age - A child must be:

  • Under age 19 at the end of the year; 
  • A student under age 24 at the end of the year; or
  • Permanently and totally disabled at any time during the year, regardless of age.

3.  Residency - The child must have lived with you for more than half the year.

4.  Support - The child can't have provided more than half of his or her own support for the year.

5.  Joint return - To meet this test, the child can't file a joint return for the year.


Qualifying Relative

If you don't meet the tests for Qualifying Child, perhaps you can be considered a qualifying relative if you are:

1.  Not a qualifying child - usually because of age or support

2.  Member of household or relationship test – You are living in their household, so you're OK here.

3.  Gross income test - To meet this test, a person's gross income for the year must be less than $4,050.  Gross income is all income in the form of money, property, and services that isn't exempt from tax.

4. Support test - To meet this test, your parents generally must provide more than half of your total support during the calendar year.   You said that they did.


You meet tests 1, 2, and 4.  You'll have to decide if you meet #3.

If this above does not answer your question, please respond to this answer string with additional info.

**Say "Thanks" by clicking the thumb icon in a post
**Mark the post that answers your question by clicking on "Mark as Best Answer"

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3 Replies
bobmednikov
New Member

I lived with my paents last year while I was treated for cancer. they provided over 1/2 of my support--

I am 26 yrs old and I made $7500 in 2016-- I guess my parents cant claim me?  right?
IreneS
Intuit Alumni

I lived with my paents last year while I was treated for cancer. they provided over 1/2 of my support--

Unfortunately, you're right.  Too old for Qualifying Child and income is too high for Qualifying Relative.
**Say "Thanks" by clicking the thumb icon in a post
**Mark the post that answers your question by clicking on "Mark as Best Answer"
IreneS
Intuit Alumni

I lived with my paents last year while I was treated for cancer. they provided over 1/2 of my support--

I'm sorry to hear about the cancer.  I hope you're doing well.

You can file your own return if you had income and are either required to file or want to file in order to get back any withholding. If you are single and your age is:

  • under 65 - your gross income must be at least $10,350
  • 65 or older - your gross income must be at least $11,900


If you are not required to file a return, and choose not to file, you can let your parents claim you as a dependent as long as you meet the requirements as a qualifying child or qualifying relative.

Qualifying Child

1.  Relationship - You're their daughter -- no problem there.

2.  Age - A child must be:

  • Under age 19 at the end of the year; 
  • A student under age 24 at the end of the year; or
  • Permanently and totally disabled at any time during the year, regardless of age.

3.  Residency - The child must have lived with you for more than half the year.

4.  Support - The child can't have provided more than half of his or her own support for the year.

5.  Joint return - To meet this test, the child can't file a joint return for the year.


Qualifying Relative

If you don't meet the tests for Qualifying Child, perhaps you can be considered a qualifying relative if you are:

1.  Not a qualifying child - usually because of age or support

2.  Member of household or relationship test – You are living in their household, so you're OK here.

3.  Gross income test - To meet this test, a person's gross income for the year must be less than $4,050.  Gross income is all income in the form of money, property, and services that isn't exempt from tax.

4. Support test - To meet this test, your parents generally must provide more than half of your total support during the calendar year.   You said that they did.


You meet tests 1, 2, and 4.  You'll have to decide if you meet #3.

If this above does not answer your question, please respond to this answer string with additional info.

**Say "Thanks" by clicking the thumb icon in a post
**Mark the post that answers your question by clicking on "Mark as Best Answer"
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