topic Are Social Security Benefits considered taxable income in Retirement tax questions https://ttlc.intuit.com/community/retirement/discussion/are-social-security-benefits-considered-taxable-income/01/520152#M48330 How do I enter it under wages &amp; income without an Employer ID number? Wed, 05 Jun 2019 03:11:32 GMT 1989fourwinns 2019-06-05T03:11:32Z Are Social Security Benefits considered taxable income https://ttlc.intuit.com/community/retirement/discussion/are-social-security-benefits-considered-taxable-income/01/520152#M48330 How do I enter it under wages &amp; income without an Employer ID number? Wed, 05 Jun 2019 03:11:32 GMT https://ttlc.intuit.com/community/retirement/discussion/are-social-security-benefits-considered-taxable-income/01/520152#M48330 1989fourwinns 2019-06-05T03:11:32Z Social Security Benefits are sometimes taxable depending... https://ttlc.intuit.com/community/retirement/discussion/social-security-benefits-are-sometimes-taxable-depending/01/520161#M48331 <P>Social Security Benefits are <U>sometimes taxable </U>depending on how much other income you had for the year and your marital status.</P><P>You don't enter Social Security Benefits as wages. You would have received an SSA-1099, and you would report it under Retirement &nbsp;Plans and Social Security,&nbsp;<B>Social Security (SSA-1099, RRB-1099)</B></P><UL> <LI> <B>Tax Formula.&nbsp;</B>&nbsp;Here’s a quick way to find out if you must pay taxes on your Social Security benefits: Add one-half of your Social Security to all your other income, including tax-exempt interest. Then compare the total to the base amount for your filing status. If your total is more than the base amount, some of your benefits may be taxable.<BR /><BR /> </LI> <LI> <B>Base Amounts.</B>&nbsp;&nbsp;The three base amounts are:<BR /> </LI> <LI><UL> <LI>$25,000 – if you are single, head of household, qualifying widow or widower with a dependent child or married filing separately and lived apart from your spouse for all of 2014</LI> <LI>$32,000 – if you are married filing jointly</LI> <LI>$0 – if you are married filing separately and lived with your spouse at any time during the year<BR /> </LI> </UL></LI> </UL><P> <A href="https://www.irs.gov/uac/Social-Security-Benefits-and-Your-Taxes1" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">https://www.irs.gov/uac/Social-Security-Benefits-and-Your-Taxes1</A> <BR /> </P> Wed, 05 Jun 2019 03:11:34 GMT https://ttlc.intuit.com/community/retirement/discussion/social-security-benefits-are-sometimes-taxable-depending/01/520161#M48331 IsabellaG 2019-06-05T03:11:34Z
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topic Are Social Security Benefits considered taxable income in Retirement tax questions
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How do I enter it under wages &amp; income without an Employer ID number?
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Are Social Security Benefits considered taxable income
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https://ttlc.intuit.com/community/retirement/discussion/are-social-security-benefits-considered-taxable-income/01/520152#M48330
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How do I enter it under wages &amp; income without an Employer ID number?
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Social Security Benefits are sometimes taxable depending...
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https://ttlc.intuit.com/community/retirement/discussion/social-security-benefits-are-sometimes-taxable-depending/01/520161#M48331
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<P>Social Security Benefits are <U>sometimes taxable </U>depending on how much other income you had for the year and your marital status.</P><P>You don't enter Social Security Benefits as wages. You would have received an SSA-1099, and you would report it under Retirement &nbsp;Plans and Social Security,&nbsp;<B>Social Security (SSA-1099, RRB-1099)</B></P><UL> <LI> <B>Tax Formula.&nbsp;</B>&nbsp;Here’s a quick way to find out if you must pay taxes on your Social Security benefits: Add one-half of your Social Security to all your other income, including tax-exempt interest. Then compare the total to the base amount for your filing status. If your total is more than the base amount, some of your benefits may be taxable.<BR /><BR /> </LI> <LI> <B>Base Amounts.</B>&nbsp;&nbsp;The three base amounts are:<BR /> </LI> <LI><UL> <LI>$25,000 – if you are single, head of household, qualifying widow or widower with a dependent child or married filing separately and lived apart from your spouse for all of 2014</LI> <LI>$32,000 – if you are married filing jointly</LI> <LI>$0 – if you are married filing separately and lived with your spouse at any time during the year<BR /> </LI> </UL></LI> </UL><P> <A href="https://www.irs.gov/uac/Social-Security-Benefits-and-Your-Taxes1" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">https://www.irs.gov/uac/Social-Security-Benefits-and-Your-Taxes1</A> <BR /> </P>
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<pubDate>Wed, 05 Jun 2019 03:11:34 GMT</pubDate>
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