Solved: Do I file if I am still working, draw social security, and 67 yrs old. Husband is 63, working, draws social security??
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Do I file if I am still working, draw social security, and 67 yrs old. Husband is 63, working, draws social security??

 
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Do I file if I am still working, draw social security, and 67 yrs old. Husband is 63, working, draws social security??

There is no age limit to filing a tax return, it is based on income. If you are both still working, there is a likelihood that you will be required to file and part of your social security may be taxable. 

See the filing requirements below.

The Gross income requirements for each filing status (If your income is below these, you don't need to file.)

  • Single: $10,350 if under age 65. $11,900 if 65 and older.
  • Married filing jointly: $20,700 if both under 65. ...
  • Married filing separately -- $4,050 at any age.
  • Qualifying widow(er) with a dependent child: $16,650 if under 65. ...
  • Head of household: $13,350 if under 65.

The IRS increases the standard deduction amount for taxpayers who are 65 or older by the end of the tax year. As a consequence, the income threshold you use to evaluate whether you should file a tax return increases by $1,000. If your 65th birthday falls on January 1, you can take the larger standard deduction for the prior tax year since the IRS treats you as being 65 on December 31

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New Member

Do I file if I am still working, draw social security, and 67 yrs old. Husband is 63, working, draws social security??

There is no age limit to filing a tax return, it is based on income. If you are both still working, there is a likelihood that you will be required to file and part of your social security may be taxable. 

See the filing requirements below.

The Gross income requirements for each filing status (If your income is below these, you don't need to file.)

  • Single: $10,350 if under age 65. $11,900 if 65 and older.
  • Married filing jointly: $20,700 if both under 65. ...
  • Married filing separately -- $4,050 at any age.
  • Qualifying widow(er) with a dependent child: $16,650 if under 65. ...
  • Head of household: $13,350 if under 65.

The IRS increases the standard deduction amount for taxpayers who are 65 or older by the end of the tax year. As a consequence, the income threshold you use to evaluate whether you should file a tax return increases by $1,000. If your 65th birthday falls on January 1, you can take the larger standard deduction for the prior tax year since the IRS treats you as being 65 on December 31

View solution in original post

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