I’m 19 and still live with my parents and don’t pa...
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New Member

I’m 19 and still live with my parents and don’t pay rent just personal things should they still claim me in their taxes ?

 
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Level 15

I’m 19 and still live with my parents and don’t pay rent just personal things should they still claim me in their taxes ?

You haven't provided enough information to answer that question.

When did you turn 19?

Are you a full time student?

How much income do you have?

 

There are two types of dependents, "Qualifying Children"(QC) and standard ("Qualifying Relative" in IRS parlance even though they don't have to actually be related). There is no income limit for a QC but there is an age limit (19), student status, a relationship test and residence test. Only a QC qualifies a taxpayer for the Earned Income Credit. They are interrelated but the rules are different for each.

 

See full rules at 

https://turbotax.intuit.com/tax-tools/tax-tips/Family/Rules-for-Claiming-a-Dependent-on-Your-Tax-Ret...

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Level 15

I’m 19 and still live with my parents and don’t pay rent just personal things should they still claim me in their taxes ?

If you were

 - Under the age of 19 on Dec 31 of the tax year

 ****************OR***************

 - Under the age of 24 on Dec 31 of the tax year and;

 - Were a full time student for any one semester that started in the tax year (this includes high school) and;

 - You did not provide more than half of your own support and;

 -You were enrolled in an accredited institution (which includes high school) and:

 - You were enrolled in a course of study that will lead to a degree or credentialed certification (yes, a high school diploma is a credentialed certification) then;

The parents qualify to claim the student as a dependent on the parent's tax return.

If the student is required to file a tax return then the student must select the option for "I can be claimed on someone else's return". It *does* *not* *matter* if the parents actually claim the student or not. The key word here is *QUALIFY*. So if the parents just "qualify" to claim the student, the student has no choice and must select the option for "I can be claimed on someone else's return" weather the parents claim the student or not.

For the above scenario please note that there is absolutely no requirement for the parents to provide the student any support. Not one single penny. The support requirement is on the student, and only student. So if you were living at home with our parents I seriously doubt you can prove you provided more than half of your own support.

Also note that with the above scenario, your earnings do not matter. You could have earned a million dollars in 2019 (literally!) and yet still qualify to be claimed as a dependent on your parent's tax return.  Now lets move to the next scenario.

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If you were "OVER" the age of 18 on Dec 31 of the tax year and you were "NOT" a student in 2019, and you have "MORE" than $4,200 of earned income during the tax year, then your parents can "NOT" claim you as a dependent on their tax return.

Earned income can only come from a W-2 job, self-employment, and/or income reported to you in box 3 or 7 of a 1099-MISC.  Cash payments received by you and not reported on a W-2 or 1099-MISC are considered self-employment income.

Rental income reported on SCH E is not "earned" income. It's passive income.

Investment income reported to you on a 1099-INT, 1099-DIV and a number of other types of 1099's is not earned income. (except as specified for 1099-MISC above.)

 

 

 

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