Solved: How do we deduct Business Meals in 2018?
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Level 3

How do we deduct Business Meals in 2018?

I'm on the Home & Office edition & I only see Business Travel Meals, not Business Meals.  Where do I go to deduct Business Meals this year (2018 tax year)?  TY.

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Accepted Solutions
New Member

How do we deduct Business Meals in 2018?

They are in the same section. There are two entries 50% and 100% deductible. Here is the difference:

Most work-related meals expenses are 50% deductible. Enter the total amount you spent, and we'll do the math for you when we have all your expenses.

Some examples of deductible work-related meals include:
  • Meals during business travel
  • Office snacks
  • Meals at a seminar or conference
  • Meals while conducting business
  • Other meals expenses


Entertainment expenses and meals included in entertainment costs are no longer deductible. This includes:

  • Meals with customers, clients, or employees without a business purpose/discussion
  • Club dues (country clubs, golf and athletic clubs)
  • Tickets to sporting, theatre, entertainment, or charitable events
  • Night clubs, cocktail lounges, and other activities
  • Lavish or extravagant entertainment expenses, like renting a yacht for a private dinner
  • Meals, transportation, and parking associated with entertainment activities
  • Hunting, vacations, and other similar trips

Example: A meal purchased after a round of golf where business is conducted or discussed could be deductible, but tickets to a sporting event that includes a meal, like food served in box seats, isn't deductible.

There are a few examples of when you can deduct 100% of your work-related meals:

  • Meal expenses for a company picnic or holiday party
  • Food made available to the public for free
  • Reimbursed expenses to employees and contractors that is included on the W-2 or Form 1099 as taxable compensation
  • Meal expenses that are sold to a client or customer, like providing meals as part of a daycare service


View solution in original post

1 Reply
New Member

How do we deduct Business Meals in 2018?

They are in the same section. There are two entries 50% and 100% deductible. Here is the difference:

Most work-related meals expenses are 50% deductible. Enter the total amount you spent, and we'll do the math for you when we have all your expenses.

Some examples of deductible work-related meals include:
  • Meals during business travel
  • Office snacks
  • Meals at a seminar or conference
  • Meals while conducting business
  • Other meals expenses


Entertainment expenses and meals included in entertainment costs are no longer deductible. This includes:

  • Meals with customers, clients, or employees without a business purpose/discussion
  • Club dues (country clubs, golf and athletic clubs)
  • Tickets to sporting, theatre, entertainment, or charitable events
  • Night clubs, cocktail lounges, and other activities
  • Lavish or extravagant entertainment expenses, like renting a yacht for a private dinner
  • Meals, transportation, and parking associated with entertainment activities
  • Hunting, vacations, and other similar trips

Example: A meal purchased after a round of golf where business is conducted or discussed could be deductible, but tickets to a sporting event that includes a meal, like food served in box seats, isn't deductible.

There are a few examples of when you can deduct 100% of your work-related meals:

  • Meal expenses for a company picnic or holiday party
  • Food made available to the public for free
  • Reimbursed expenses to employees and contractors that is included on the W-2 or Form 1099 as taxable compensation
  • Meal expenses that are sold to a client or customer, like providing meals as part of a daycare service


View solution in original post

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