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jennzdbest
New Member

I claimed my adult son because I supported him even though he had a job. Now he wants to get his tax return and it is saying he owes. how do I fix this since I filed

 
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GeoffreyG
New Member

I claimed my adult son because I supported him even though he had a job. Now he wants to get his tax return and it is saying he owes. how do I fix this since I filed

Have you already e-filed your tax return?  And has it been "accepted" (not rejected) by the IRS?  If so, then in order to change any information on your tax return, such as removing your son as a dependent, you will need to do what is known as "amend" your tax return (discussed below).  Unfortunately, once a tax return is filed and accepted, there is no way to simply recall it or get it back to change something.  The analogy here is very much like physically dropping a sealed letter into a locked mail box at the post office:  once something goes in it cannot be taken back out.

But before you complete an amended tax return, please know that you'll need to first wait at least several weeks until your original return is processed, and your original tax refund is sent to you.  After that time you can then complete your amended return; but this time not claim your adult son as a dependent.  You will also have to print and mail this amended return (plus an amended state tax return, if applicable).  Yes, amended tax returns must indeed be printed on paper and physically mailed; they cannot be e-filed.

Moreover, your son, if he wishes to claim his own personal "dependency" tax exemption this year (which is not possible as long as he is still listed as a dependent on your tax return), then he would have to wait to file his own tax return until both your original tax return, and your amended tax return, are each processed by the government.  Only at that point will the IRS records be "clear" for him to use his own personal exemption, without being rejected as an invalid tax position.  This whole sequence of events may take several few months of time to fully complete, as amended returns typically take at least 8 to 12 weeks to manually process.

For further information on how to amend a 2016 tax return in TurboTax, please find below a link to a TurboTax webpage for the current year amendment process.  We will keep that page updated throughout the tax filing season.

https://ttlc.intuit.com/questions/2952222-how-do-i-amend-my-2016-turbotax-online-return

 

You can also see the following webpage for additional information on amending.  This will help you to better understand what is going on with an amended tax return, and what you need to do.

https://ttlc.intuit.com/questions/1908543-do-i-need-to-amend-my-tax-return


Obviously, all this entails a whole lot of work and effort.  While it can certainly be done (and millions of taxpayers do file amended returns every year), you may wish to ask yourself if this actually necessary or even desirable.  Another possibility, and one which would avoid you having to amend your tax return at all, and which would also not delay the filing of your son's tax return, is offered here as a reasonable suggestion.  In my private practice as a CPA, I have urged similar solutions (mostly successfully), to other sets of taxpayers, when faced with similar circumstances.

The advice basically goes like this:  Rather than amending your tax return and delaying the filing of his tax return for months, there is nothing in the tax law that would prohibit you compensating your son (by way of making a small financial "gift" to him, let's call it) for allowing him to remain on your own tax return as a dependent, just as you originally filed it.  Presumably you received a net financial benefit by claiming him as a dependent in the first instance, in the form of a larger tax refund for yourself, yes?  If so, and when he is compensated for this to some extent, then he can file a tax return for himself, indicating that you are claiming him (this year) on your tax return -- but in doing so he will be no worse off financially than the alternative.  In other words, you could offer to pay him for leaving the tax situation the way it currently is.  And in doing so, you will have saved both of you a lot of time and trouble.

However, amending your tax return, waiting several weeks, and then having your son file his tax return (as is described above) is also a perfectly valid solution.

Thank you for asking this important question.



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1 Reply
GeoffreyG
New Member

I claimed my adult son because I supported him even though he had a job. Now he wants to get his tax return and it is saying he owes. how do I fix this since I filed

Have you already e-filed your tax return?  And has it been "accepted" (not rejected) by the IRS?  If so, then in order to change any information on your tax return, such as removing your son as a dependent, you will need to do what is known as "amend" your tax return (discussed below).  Unfortunately, once a tax return is filed and accepted, there is no way to simply recall it or get it back to change something.  The analogy here is very much like physically dropping a sealed letter into a locked mail box at the post office:  once something goes in it cannot be taken back out.

But before you complete an amended tax return, please know that you'll need to first wait at least several weeks until your original return is processed, and your original tax refund is sent to you.  After that time you can then complete your amended return; but this time not claim your adult son as a dependent.  You will also have to print and mail this amended return (plus an amended state tax return, if applicable).  Yes, amended tax returns must indeed be printed on paper and physically mailed; they cannot be e-filed.

Moreover, your son, if he wishes to claim his own personal "dependency" tax exemption this year (which is not possible as long as he is still listed as a dependent on your tax return), then he would have to wait to file his own tax return until both your original tax return, and your amended tax return, are each processed by the government.  Only at that point will the IRS records be "clear" for him to use his own personal exemption, without being rejected as an invalid tax position.  This whole sequence of events may take several few months of time to fully complete, as amended returns typically take at least 8 to 12 weeks to manually process.

For further information on how to amend a 2016 tax return in TurboTax, please find below a link to a TurboTax webpage for the current year amendment process.  We will keep that page updated throughout the tax filing season.

https://ttlc.intuit.com/questions/2952222-how-do-i-amend-my-2016-turbotax-online-return

 

You can also see the following webpage for additional information on amending.  This will help you to better understand what is going on with an amended tax return, and what you need to do.

https://ttlc.intuit.com/questions/1908543-do-i-need-to-amend-my-tax-return


Obviously, all this entails a whole lot of work and effort.  While it can certainly be done (and millions of taxpayers do file amended returns every year), you may wish to ask yourself if this actually necessary or even desirable.  Another possibility, and one which would avoid you having to amend your tax return at all, and which would also not delay the filing of your son's tax return, is offered here as a reasonable suggestion.  In my private practice as a CPA, I have urged similar solutions (mostly successfully), to other sets of taxpayers, when faced with similar circumstances.

The advice basically goes like this:  Rather than amending your tax return and delaying the filing of his tax return for months, there is nothing in the tax law that would prohibit you compensating your son (by way of making a small financial "gift" to him, let's call it) for allowing him to remain on your own tax return as a dependent, just as you originally filed it.  Presumably you received a net financial benefit by claiming him as a dependent in the first instance, in the form of a larger tax refund for yourself, yes?  If so, and when he is compensated for this to some extent, then he can file a tax return for himself, indicating that you are claiming him (this year) on your tax return -- but in doing so he will be no worse off financially than the alternative.  In other words, you could offer to pay him for leaving the tax situation the way it currently is.  And in doing so, you will have saved both of you a lot of time and trouble.

However, amending your tax return, waiting several weeks, and then having your son file his tax return (as is described above) is also a perfectly valid solution.

Thank you for asking this important question.



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